Brownies

This recipe is from Sally’s Baking Addiction and it makes extremely delicious brownies.

One of my nutritional goals is to make as much as possible at home, and to buy as little in boxes as possible. Instead, I have adapted to keeping a pantry with basic ingredients that can combine to make anything. Instead of 8 boxes for different purposes, I have one bag of flour and 1 container of salt. Baking soda. Sugar. Vanilla. Elemental ingredients are much more versatile than pre-made mixes for specific things-they can be utilized for anything.

Baking is interesting because it feels much more like a chemistry experiment than regular cooking. An improvisational style isn’t welcome with baked goods unless you’ve already mastered ratios, and have a full & complete understanding of what exactly happens to each ingredient when combined. If you mix things in a different order, you will get a different result. The eggs need to be whipped a certain way, flour must not be over-mixed, and sugar is considered a liquid ingredient. It’s quite exciting to end up with a perfectly textured, delicious result, but things can go awry all too easily. The important thing to remember when baking is that, as a beginner, you are more of a chemist than an artist. The flair and flourishes come later.

These brownies are the first I tried to make on my own and they are everything a brownie should be. Easy to make and extremely easy to eat. I found the recipe looking for a new raspberry dessert recipe, and found Sally’s Raspberry Cheesecake Brownies. Those are probably the greatest things on the planet, but I’ve only worked with plain chocolate thus far…

brownies

Brownies
• 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter
• 6 – 8 ounces semi-sweet chocolate
• 1 and 1/4 cups sugar
• 3 eggs
• 1 tsp vanilla
• 3/4 cup flour
• 1/4 tsp salt
• Optional: 1 tsp fresh coffee grounds
• Optional: walnuts

1. Chop chocolate. It is okay to cut semi-sweet chocolate with unsweetened chocolate. This goes against the chemistry thoughts earlier, but a couple ounces of unsweetened chocolate with a 4 ounce package of semi-sweet chocolate comes out okay. I tossed in about an extra tablespoon of sugar for this.
2. Add to bain-marie with butter, mixing constantly over medium heat until liquified. Allow to cool to room temperature.
3. Stir sugar into butter & chocolate mixture until combined.
4. Add eggs one at a time, whisking after each addition
5. Fold in flour and salt. If you are adding coffee, walnuts, or whatever other tasty objects you have in mind, sprinkle into mix at this step.
6. Butter and flour a square baking dish. Pour batter in and bake for 35 – 45 minutes, depending on your oven. If they are still not finished but seem to be getting dry around the edges, cover with foil until finished.

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Tiramisu

tiramisu

 

Cake:

• 1 cup flour
• 1 cup sugar
• 2 eggs
• 1/2 cup (almond) milk
• 2 T butter
• 1 tsp baking powder

1. Whisk(by hand or with electric mixer) eggs for 3 or 4 minutes until they are thick. Gradually add sugar, beating until light.

2. Add flour and baking powder all at once and mix just until combined.

3. Heat milk and butter over medium heat until butter melts.

4. Add to batter and whisk until totally combined and creamy.

5. Pour into greased and floured pan. I used a square pan, but round, rectangular, cupcake, small rectangular–any pan can be used depending on what you’re envisioning as your end result. Bake 20 – 30 minutes in a 350 degree oven.


Syrup:

• 1 cup strong coffee or espresso
• 2 – 3 T rum or Kahlua
• 1 T sugar

1. When coffee is cool, mix.

Filling:
• 1 egg white
• 8 oz (1 cup) mascarpone or cream cheese (room temperature)
• 1 cup whipped cream (frozen)
• 1/4 cup sugar
• 1 T powdered sugar
• 1 tsp vanilla extract

1. In an electric mixer, whip egg white with a pinch of sugar until frothy and light. Add rest of sugar and continue to whip.

2. Add cream cheese, vanilla, powdered sugar, and whipped cream. Whip for 5 – 10 minutes on medium high speed until it reaches desired consistency.

Filling based on Jacques Pépin’s recipe, which uses sour cream instead of whipped cream and omits egg*

Tiramisu:

1. Remove cake from pan. Slice horizontally in half and separate.

2. Assemble three components as desired. Place bottom half back into pan used for baking, onto serving tray, or into presentational dish. A trifle bowl or clear glass can make a very elegant presentation. I used small glasses to make verrines: I stamped the top of the glass onto the cake, then pushed it down for each layer.

3. Spoon or slowly pour coffee syrup onto cake. Allow to absorb then spoon a bit more until it is moistened but not completely saturated. The cake can also be dipped or soaked in the syrup, but I found soaking made the cake difficult to manipulate/move to a serving dish.

3. Add a filling layer, spreading or shaping with a rubber spatula. You can also pipe the filling for nice presentation.

3. Repeat layers as many times as you see fit, ending with a filling layer. Spoon cocoa powder into a strainer and shake to completely cover the top. Garnish with chocolate shavings or a raspberry if desired.

Tiramisu will keep comfortably until the next day, but it is advisable to make only what will be consumed immediately, storing the filling, cake, and syrup separately. This is especially convenient if you do not have many people to feed; I used half this cake for 4 single-serving tiramisu, then used the other half for petits fours.

Croissants and Pain au chocolat

Croissants, like any bread, take a while to make, but I was surprised to learn that the actual work croissants require is minimal. They (thankfully) require no kneading — just rolling with a rolling-pin multiple times.

Due to the structure of waiting time, its good to begin the process the night before a day when you will be around the house, or the morning before you work. The first waiting time is longest and doesn’t involve you, the baker, at all. After it is mixed, the dough needs to rest for 6 – 8 hours or overnight. The second stage is similarly lengthy but punctuated rolling every 2 – 3 hours, 3 – 4 (or more) times. So, you will need to be home to make croissants, but will be able to concentrate on doing something else for pretty much the entire day.

In the end, you will have about a dozen large croissants, or many small ones. I like to make one pan with half the dough, then form and freeze the rest to have infinite fancy breakfasts.

croissant

• 2 cups flour
• 1 packet dry yeast
• 2 T sugar
• 2/3 c (almond) milk
• 1 1/4 tsp salt
• 1 egg
• butter

1. Pour milk into a medium bowl and microwave until 90-100 degrees, or for 2 – 3 minutes.

2. Add sugar and yeast; mix to combine. Add 1/2 cup flour. Mix and allow to sit for 15 minutes, when it should start to bubble.

3. Mix in remaining flour and form into loose ball. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.

[[Optional Step 3.5: At this stage you can prepare the butter by allowing it to reach room temperature then slowly mixing until pliable or by slicing, laying out in a thin layer on plastic wrap, and beating it with a rolling-pin. In either case, you will form it into a medium-sized square and refrigerate to chill again. I did not do these steps as I wasn’t sure how big my dough square would be.]]

4. Remove dough from refrigerator. Roll, trying to maintain a square or rectangular shape.

5. When it is rather thin but not translucent, add cold butter. Slice and line up in continuous square about 2 – 3 inches from each edge.

6. Fold edge flaps over butter to form square. The butter should be tucked and nestled in there so the whole thing looks like a butter galette. Then, fold one edge one-third of the way over. Fold the opposite edge over that edge, so it is a rectangle of dough hugging itself.

7 . Roll gently into rectangle that is slightly smaller than your first rectangle. Fold one end one-third of the way, then fold the opposite end over it to create another hug. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1 – 2 hours.

8. Repeat step 7, rolling dough, folding it over itself, then refrigerating for another hour. Repeat again once or twice, depending on how much time you’ve allotted for this process. It should be folded at least a few times, as more folds will mean more butter layers and therefore more flakiness.

9. Heat oven to 200 degrees (or the lowest possible setting) and roll dough into another rectangle. Make a single line lengthwise. Fold one half in thirds, cover with plastic wrap, and put back in refrigerator.

10. Coat a baking sheet with butter, then flour. Cut dough strip into triangles.

For croissants, roll, starting with the longest side, over itself, leaving the final tip on the bottom. Place on baking sheet straight or curve the ends together to create a crescent shape.

For pain au chocolat, position the triangle with the longest side near you. Put a vertical stripe of chocolate near each side closest to you, essentially making two mini triangles. Fold both sides over into themselves and place on pan seam side down.

11. Turn off oven. Brush croissants with water and put in oven for 1 – 1 1/2 hours. Alternatively, use a proofing box, set or otherwise regulated to maintain 70 – 80 degrees.

12. Remove from oven after about an hour. Croissants should be nearly double in size. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Brush croissants with beaten egg. If you are making pain au chocolat, sprinkle with sugar. Set aside for 15 minutes.

13. Bake for 20 minutes, or more if you prefer them darker.  Freeze remaining dough.

Butternut Squash Burgers (and Fries)

burger

 

Butternut Squash Burger
• 1/2 butternut squash (about 1 1/2 – 2 cups)
• 1/2 can or 1/2 cup black beans
• 3 T white onion, diced
• 1/4 cup fine bread crumbs
• 1 T dried chives
• 1 tsp each: thyme, garlic, sage, chili powder, pepper

1. Peel butternut squash. For these burgers, I just used the top half of a butternut squash and ended up with 7 medium-sized burgers, but you can use more or less. Cut squash into cubes and steam (I use a steamer basket) until soft.

2. In a wide, flat bowl, mash cubes with fork. Add onions and spices, then bread crumbs and continue to mash. Add black beans and lightly stir.

3. Roll into ball and flatten.

4. Sauté in vegetable oil over medium high heat. Burgers are fragile, so allow to sit for a while before flipping, checking, or manipulating. Resist the urge to constantly flip! They are finished when quite dark on both sides.

5. Serve on their own (they are delicious and don’t need dressing up) or as a meat substitute on a bun with onion, ketchup, lettuce, tomato, pickles, other sauces… anything you like :)

French Fries

• 2 – 4 potatoes
• 1/2 cup flour
• 2 T chili powder
• 1 T pepper
• 1 T mixture of thyme, garlic, and fine sea salt
• water and oil

1. Slice edge of potato lengthwise to create a rectangle with round ends. Cut off ends. Slice lengthwise to create about 5 slices. Flip and repeat to make long, thin, squared fries. Slice the ends and edges too.

2. Immerse completely in warm water. Soak for a half hour.

3. Drain and rinse. Dry with kitchen towel, then squeeze with paper towel for complete dryness.

4. Mix flour with spices (whichever spices you like and however much you like) in a gallon-sized storage bag. Add fries, zip closed, and mix to coat completely.

5. Roast at 450 degrees for half hour.

6. Remove from oven and allow to cool. Fill a pot or saucepan with a couple inches of vegetable oil and heat over medium high.

7. When water sprinkled into the oil sizzles, it is hot enough. Add potatoes and fry for 5 – 10 minutes until crisp.

8. Season with pepper, sea salt, and spices.

Choux Pastry

Choux pastry is a versatile and light dough that can be used for spectacular desserts and savory treats. Considering how special and *fancy* puffs are when baked, they actually are rather straightforward to make. If you’ve made choux once, subsequent attempts will seem incredibly simple. I like Jacques Pépin’s recipe and directions because the ingredients are minimal/elemental and the long wait times allow you to go about your day while making something magnificent.

I use most of the batter for sweet cream puffs, reserving a half or third for savory cheese gougères.

choux

Choux pastry
• 1 cup water
• 4 T butter
• 1 cup flour
• 4 eggs
• 1/4 tsp salt

1. Boil water, pieces of butter, and salt in saucepan.

2. When butter is melted, remove from heat and add all flour.

3. Quickly mix with wooden spoon until dough begins to form a ball.

4. Put pan over low heat and ‘dry’ for 1 to 2 minutes, mixing occasionally. Try to collect all dough into a single ball to avoid dry bits.

5. Transfer to a slightly larger bowl than would seem necessary and let cool at least 5 minutes. Add eggs one at a time, beating after each. The dough will seem to resist coming together, with large pieces sloshing about in the egg (so the larger bowl should be helpful), but keep mixing. It is finished when the dough is thick and creamy.

6. Coat a heavy baking sheet completely with butter, rubbing with wax paper or just holding the stick and fully covering the pan. Sprinkle flour, then hit and shake the pan to coat completely.

8. For Cream Puffs, put dough into pastry bag with large round tip and pipe golf ball sized puffs.
For Éclairs, drag the pastry bag to make a puff that is about 3 inches long and oval.
For Gougères, add some shredded cheese (Gruyére, Cheddar, Parmesan, etc) and/or herbs to dough. More makes for flat puffs, which will look like boring, normal biscuits. Just using a tablespoon or two will allow for savory flavor while preserving the fun puffiness.

9. Brush with beaten egg, smoothing out tips and obvious imperfections as you go. For a design, drag a fork across the top. Allow to dry for at least 20 minutes.

10. Bake at 375 degrees for 35 minutes, until puffed and golden. When finished, turn off heat and open oven door halfway, letting the puffs cool slowly and dry for a half hour (inside oven).

Filling

Make Custard Cream Filling:
• 2 cups (vanilla almond) milk
• 2 beaten eggs
• 2/3 c sugar
• 1/2 c flour
• pinch salt
• 1 tsp vanilla
• 1 T butter

1. Warm milk in saucepan over medium low heat.

2. Mix flour, sugar, and salt in bowl. Add eggs and combine, beating well.

3. Slowly add flour-egg mixture to milk, stirring with whisk.

4. It will thicken in a few minutes, but if it does not, add more flour until desired thickness is reached.

5. Add vanilla, continuing to stir.

To fill puff pastry, stab side of puff with pastry tip and squeeze until puff feels full.

Éclairs can be filled the same way depending on your tool, but it is efficient to make a slit lengthwise along the side of the éclair and fill.

Gougères are great on their own or can be filled with a soft cheese and/or other vegetables. Goat cheese with herbs and minced mushrooms and olives is quite good.

Ganache
• 1/2 cup or 4 ounces bittersweet or semi-sweet chocolate
• 1/2 cup heavy cream or 1/4 cup regular milk
• 1 T dark rum or Kahlua

1. If you don’t have one (like me), make a bain-marie using two pans of approximately the same circumference. Fill the first with water and boil.

2. Turn heat down to high to preserve a delicate/light boil and place pieces of chocolate in second pan. Put second pan on top of water pan and allow chocolate to melt, mixing frequently with rubber spatula. Alternatively/rationally, melt chocolate in microwave.

3. Pour cream and rum into bowl, then pour melted chocolate into mixture. Whisk until it is creamy. It will be slightly thinner than seems necessary but if it is too watery/thin, melt and add more chocolate. It should be thick enough to coat a cream puff without being translucent, but thin enough to pour.

Pour over cream puffs or éclairs.
For gougères, sprinkle grated cheese and herbs on top instead of ganache.

Coquilles St Jacques à la Provençale

coquilles

This is a very elegant dish and can be accompanied by a variety of vegetables. The first time I used tomato instead of mushroom, but I think it would be delicious with both, so both are included in the recipe. I also used cheese instead of the cream mixture which was more dry, and as it was gruyére it totally overwhelmed the delicate scallops. The reduction is just as creamy, more subtle, and well worth the effort. Plus, wine!

I made the above picture for New Years Eve, served with green beans and a mixture of brown rice, lentils, and onion. The green bean recipe is also included below.

• 5 scallops
• 5-10 mushrooms, diced
• 1 small yellow onion or 2 shallots, diced
• 1 small tomato, diced
• 1 T mixture of parsley, thyme, sage, and tarragon
• 1/4 tsp minced garlic
• 1 bay leaf
• 1 cup dry white wine
• 1/2 c water
• 1/4 c (almond) milk or cream
• 3 T butter
• 1 – 2 T flour

1. Heat mushrooms and half of onions in butter and garlic. Allow to heat for about 10 minutes, then add thyme, salt & pepper, and sage. Cook for 10 more minutes then pour into a gratin pan or baking/pie dish.

2. In the same pan, reduce white wine, water, bay leaf, and rest of onions.

3. Slice scallops-each should create 2 – 3 thin slices. Add to reduction and cook for a few minutes over medium heat.

4. Dice and layer tomato over mushroom and onion mixture. Follow with scallops, arranged in single layer with slight overlap.

5. Remove reduction from pan, pouring into bowl. In same pan, make a roux by combining 2 T butter and 2 T flour over medium heat.

6. When roux is thickened and smooth, add reduction along with milk and cream. Allow to cook over medium heat for a few minutes until thickened. Mix frequently with whisk.

7. Pour liquid over scallops and broil (high) until brown and bubbly. Garnish with fresh herbs, like parsley or thyme.

Green Beans
1 – 2 cups Green beans
2 T Butter
1 T Pure honey
1 T Crushed walnuts

1. Melt 1 T butter over medium heat.

2. Slice tips off fresh green beans and add to pan, mixing to coat with butter.

3. Allow to cook for a few minutes, then drizzle honey on beans, add remaining butter, and stir to coat.

4. Add walnuts and allow to cook until beans are just beginning to be marked by pan and the walnuts are slightly softened.

5. Never ever ever eat canned green beans again

Cranberry Muffins

muffins

This recipe is from the Better Homes and Gardens Cookbook. It includes a base muffin recipe, with instructions for different fillings like berries, bananas, cheese, poppyseed, or oats. I’ve included cranberry, blueberry, and oat because those are the versions I’ve made so far. If you’d like the quantities for the others, leave a comment!

Muffins

• 1 3/4 c flour
• 1/3 c sugar
• 2 tsp baking powder
• 1/4 tsp salt
• 1 egg
• 3/4 c milk
• 1/4 c vegetable oil
• berries, oats, fruit, herbs, cheese, or other filling/enhancement

1. Combine flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Make well in center.

2. In another bowl, beat egg and combine with milk and oil.

3. Add liquid mixture to well in flour, stirring until just moistened.

4. For cranberry muffins, chop 1 cup cranberries in half and add additional sugar. As they are so tart, it is best not to add extra berries. For blueberry muffins, add 1 cup whole berries, with however many extra you’d like. For oatmeal, reduce flour to 1 1/3c and add 3/4c oats.

5. Spoon into muffin cups/tray. Cover with Streusel Topping, which is made by cutting butter into dry ingredients:
• 3 T flour
• 3 T brown sugar
• 2 T butter
• 1/4 tsp cinnamon

6. Bake at 400 degrees for 18 – 20 minutes or longer, depending on how quickly the Streusel becomes golden.

Meyer Lemon Tart

lemon tart

Tart Crust
•  1 c flour
•  2 T sugar
•  1/2 t salt
•  1/2 t Meyer lemon zest
•  1 stick cold butter
•  1/2 t vanilla extract

1. Whisk together flour, sugar, salt, and lemon zest.

2. Cut in thick slices of butter with fork until dough roughly holds together.

3. Stir in water and vanilla. Shape into disk and refrigerate in plastic wrap for a half hour.

4. Press dough into tart pan, then bake at 375 degrees until golden for 25 minutes.

5. Remove tart from oven, then increase temperature to 400 degrees.

Lemon Curd Filling

•  2 large eggs
•  3 large egg yolks
•  1/4 c and 2 T sugar
•  1/4 t cornstarch
•  3T Meyer lemon zest
•  1/3c Meyer lemon juice
•  6 T butter, cut into pieces

1. While tart crust is in the oven, whisk eggs, egg yolks, sugar, and cornstarch

2. Whisk in lemon zest & juice

3. Cook over medium-low heat, stirring frequently, until thick (5-10m)

4. Remove pan from heat and whisk in butter, one piece at a time

5. Pour into tart shell and bake for 30 minutes at 400 degrees until slightly brown and/or set

5b. Midway through baking, check and deflate puffiness- I lined the outer edges of my tart with lemon slices, leaving the inside clean. It puffed up very slightly, requiring a knife poke

5c. If you cover or decorate the tart with lemons, its a good idea to coat the lemons with brown sugar beforehand-perhaps dip them in sugar to coat both sides. They retain tartness after baking, which is delicious/interesting but not for all palates.

6. Decorate with dried lemon verbena and serve warm or chilled

via Martha Stewart

Leek & Bean Cassoulet

cassoulet

Cassoulet is a meat-intensive French bean dish, a stew of remainders. This adaptation from Veganomicon by Moskowitz & Romero has the spirit and comfort of chicken pot pie. (They also include a seitan pot pie recipe that looks very good)

Most of the time invested in this recipe is dedicated to prep, so it may help to dice and cube and mince everything beforehand. Its probably possible to prepare the vegetable mixture in advance, because the finished casserole keeps fantastically for days.

• 2 potatoes
• 2 leeks
• 1 1/2c carrots
• 3/4c frozen peas
• 1 small onion
• 1 [15oz] navy or white beans, drained & rinsed
• 1 T fresh thyme, plus more for garnish
• black pepper, 1/2tsp salt
• 2 cloves minced garlic
• 2T olive oil
• 3c vegetable stock
• 3T cornstarch

Biscuits:
• 3/4c plain soy milk
• 1tsp apple cider vinegar
• 1 1/2c flour
• 2tsp baking powder
• 1/4tsp salt
• 1/4c (vegan) shortening

1. Boil potatoes for 10 minutes or until they can be easily pierced with a fork. Remove from water and allow to cool.
2. Slice the leeks into thin disks and dice the onions and carrots. Over medium heat, sauté together until soft and just beginning to brown (about 10 minutes).
3. At this point, start mixing the biscuits. First, add vinegar to the soy milk and set aside to curdle. In a mixing bowl, combine flour, baking soda, and salt.
4. Add garlic, thyme, s&p to the cooking vegetables. Cut potatoes into cubes and add along with frozen peas. Add cornstarch to vegetable stock and pour over all vegetables. Raise heat slightly and allow to simmer for about 7 minutes, stirring occasionally.
5. Add shortening to the biscuit flour mixture. Combine with fork so there are large clumps. Add soy milk and mix until it is moistened. ‘Knead’ with fork until dough holds together nicely and isn’t extremely sticky. (More flour can be added if necessary)
6. The vegetable mixture should be slightly thickened. Add to casserole dish(es), leaving an inch or so to accomodate for biscuits. Gently roll and flatten into biscuits or fun shapes and place over mixture.
7. Bake in 425 degree oven for 15 minutes in order to slightly brown biscuits. Sprinkle with thyme and serve.

Raspberry Clafouti

This is from Eric Ripert’s Get Toasted podcast, a quick recipe tailored for your toaster oven. I don’t have a toaster oven, but the recipes are perfect for one or two people, and can all be made quicky in a regular oven. His recipes included in this series are all really elegant, and his show Avec Eric was instrumental in inspiring me to learn more about cooking.

Clafouti

• 1T room temperature butter
• 1/4c sugar, with extra for the dish
• 1 egg
•  3T flour
• 6T (almond) milk
• 1tsp vanilla extract
•  Raspberries

1. Whisk egg, then add sugar, milk, and vanilla.
2. Add flour and mix until combined so as to not overwork.
3. Butter small casserole or gratin dishes (I made 3) with a brush. Coat with sugar, shaking bowl around for full coverage.
4. Place raspberries flat-side down in dishes and slowly pour mixture between, allowing them to poke out a bit.
5. Broil until the mixture is solid, which will take 8-10 minutes on high, or 15-20 on low.

Video of Eric making this recipe here

Custard Filling & Fruit Tarts

Tartsfig

Custard Filling
•2c (vanilla almond) milk
•2 beaten eggs
•2/3c sugar
•1/2c flour
•pinch salt
•1t vanilla
•1TB butter

1. Warm milk on medium heat
2. In separate bowl, mix flour, sugar, and salt. Add eggs and combine, beating well
3. Add slowly to milk, stirring with whisk.
4. If needed, add more flour- I added an extra half cup. You can also add flavors like extracts, cocoa, or citrus zest
5. Stir, cool, eat some, then fill desserts

Above tarts were made with boxed pie crust and custard leftover from cream puffs.

  • The fruit tarts have a raspberry jam glaze as I was out of apricot (just microwave for a few seconds then paint on).
  • Fig tarts: top custard with roasted figs, which are sliced in half, coated with a thin layer of brown sugar and rosemary leaves, then baked at 400/450 degrees until the sugar has caramelized.
  • Mini Apple Pies: mix diced apple, vanilla, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, then paint with milk and sprinkled with sugar.

Basic Pasta

pasta

According to Ruhlman’s awesome book Ratio, which measures by weight, pasta is 3 parts flour, 2 parts egg.

1. Pour 1 1/2c flour (whole wheat is pictured, but white or any other kind works) onto the counter, make a well in the top and crack three eggs into it.
2. Knead with your hands until appropriately doughy (5-10m) and form into disc.
3. Cover with plastic wrap and let rest for at least a half hour.
4. Cut into 4 pieces and roll, cut, shape, and either cook or let dry overnight then store.

I’ve also used this recipe for cheese ravioli–it’s totally delicious, but the scraps from cutting the ravioli squares are hard to work with. This is probably why the resting period after kneading is included, but I found that adding a small bit of water (approx 1/2-1tsp, less with less dough) to the remaining pieces made it gel together better. It still didn’t happily reconstitute like cookie dough, and was much more difficult to knead, but it still made yummy ravioli. If you want to make something that will produce scraps like that, I’d suggest doing a maximum of 2 or 3 re-rolls or planning the day’s workout around your pasta making.
(full recipe: bit.ly/jkjXTp )